St Michael
MARAZION

At the foot of St. Michael's Mount

This quaint seaside village has a charming atmosphere that fills its narrow streets and seaside footpaths. Despite it being home to just over 1000 people, there is an abundance of restaurants, pubs and beaches at its doorstep for both visitors and residents to enjoy. The dramatic St. Michael’s Mount commands the Marazion landscape, the causeway linking up with the village and the ferries that leave from the shores of the beach sprawling out in front of Marazion. The town of Penzance, with its rich maritime history, is around three miles away and a glorious seafront walk connects it to the village, with Newlyn’s artist’s community lying just beyond. Staying in Marazion you’ll also be within easy reach of the wild Lizard Peninsula as well as the popular town, St Ives – it’s a great spot to explore the beauty and variety of West Cornwall.

The marazion guide

Godolphin Arms Restaurant Lower Deck Credit Mike Searle

Seafront eateries and classic Cornish pubs...

For a small village Marazion has an impressive collection of exceptional restaurants and cosy pubs. Of course, there are plenty of great eateries and bars in the wider area too (Penzance has some great little gems) – but here’s our pick of Marazion’s finest.

Book up early and get into Ben’s Cornish Kitchen – a modest exterior that offers mouth-wateringly incredible food. It has attracted the attention of national food critics who rave about its quality – all for marvellously good value. There’s a small but excellently well-curated menu offering bistro-style dishes, each showcasing the local produce – if you can find time to eat here you won’t be disappointed.

For sweeping views across Mount’s Bay, The Godolphin Arms is the place to be. It was refurbished back in 2017, installing panoramic windows, a balcony and cool interiors, really giving this place the wow-factor. Enjoy an eclectic menu with a slight bias towards seafood caught from local boats – the service can be a little slow in the summer months but if you’re happy to sit and bask in the view then be sure to grab a bite to eat here.

For a nightcap, a lunchtime pint or a cosy fireside glass of wine, head up the hill to discover the Fire Engine Inn. The cobbled floors of The Well Bar in the lower half of the building provides a cosy, authentic pub feel whilst upstairs offers a modern maritime space complete with views over to the Mount. A great selection of local ales, and a corker of a roast, this little pub is a great place to hunker down in.

Perranuthnoe, Cornwall. Matt Jessop

A beachfront village

One of Marazion’s key features is that it is just set back from the sea, with miles of beach stretching along the bay towards Penzance. Marazion Beach is the expanse of sand that incorporates the causeway of St. Michael’s Mount and the large tides experienced here mean that when the cobbled pathway across the bay to the Mount is exposed, so is are golden sands, rock pools and gentle waves.

A little further toward Penzance lies Long Rock Beach, effectively an extension of Marazion Beach as there’s no visible divide. When the wind gets up and the tide rolls in, watch as kitesurfers soar into the air, harnessing the natural power of the wind and waves – it’s quite the spectacle.

These two beaches are well within walking distance of Marazion but there are many more to be found nearby. Discover the dramatic beauty of Porthcurno near Land’s End, or head east and explore Prussia Cove, the hidden smuggler’s landing of old, or the small yet perfect Perranuthnoe. Wherever you go, there’s plenty to see.

Tremenheere. View From The Pagoda. Karl Davies

Plenty to do

The obvious attraction of Marazion is the dramatic, unmissable St. Michael’s Mount. Discover the subtropical gardens, the tale of Cormoran the Giant and the history of the castle, as well as the village on the Mount that a few families call home. Make sure you check the website before heading out, as high winds and rough seas often cause the estate to close off access.

If subtropical gardens are your bag, make sure you make the two-mile trip to the gorgeous Tremenheere Sculpture Gardens. With stunning exotic plants, intriguing instalments and sculptures dotted around the sprawling grounds, and an impressive gallery and shop, Tremenheere is a must visit. Make sure you don’t miss the Skyspace – a fabulous experience.

For the kids on days where the beach has been exhausted or is a little cold, head to Paradise Park, home to over 130 species of birds and other animals – including Red Pandas, Otters and a petting zoo! There’s also an indoor soft play area to be absolutely sure little ones are tired out – a wonderful way to while away a day.

For more inspiration on what to do around Marazion, check out our Mount’s Bay page.

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