Forever Cornwall Coverack Harbour 2 Low Res Header
COVERACK

a harbour steeped in history

Coverack is a delightful fishing village tucked away in a sheltered bay on Cornwall’s Lizard Peninsula. It’s pretty cottages and eateries are clustered around the historic harbour, which is the focal point of activity here. Beside the harbour is also a small beach of pebbles, sand and rocks. The beach is dog-friendly all year, but they must be kept on leads.

The harbour is steeped in history. It was built in 1724 from local serpentine stone as a base for the thriving pilchard fishing fleet. Shoals of pilchard could number hundreds of thousands, so it is easy to imagine the hustle and bustle of times gone by as luggers landed the catch for salting and packing. Inshore fishing, lobster and crabbing boats still sail from here.

Scattered along the seafront road are several small cafés, souvenir shops, and a small but well stocked village shop. Also by the harbour is a fabulous chippy and restaurant housed in the old lifeboat station, offering locally landed fish and one of the best views anywhere. The excellent pub serves all manner of ales and other tipples as well as good honest pub food, and delights in welcoming visitors and local fishermen alike.

The Lizard guide

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Stunning cliff-top walks

Coverack’s location in the centre of the Lizard Peninsula’s east coast makes it a perfect base for walking some of the most breath-taking sections of the South West Coast Path. The coast in both directions are classified as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) and this is in the heart of an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) which stretches all the way to the Helford River valley on the west, and Loe Pool and Porthleven in the east.

Pass by the ancient sites of Iron Age castles at Chynalls Point and Lankidden, and take in panoramic views at Black Head, where on a clear day you can see both the Fal Estuary and the Dodman. Follow in the footsteps of The Salt Path by Raynor Winn and feel for yourself the restorative benefits of treading the Cornish coastal path. Whether you’re on a full day of hiking or an evening stroll to watch the sunset, we think you’ll agree this is a pretty special place to spend time in nature.

Lizard Wildlife Unsplash Low Res

Flora and fauna

From here you can ramble to Porthoustock, Porthallow, Kennack Sands, Cadgwith or even Lizard Point itself, mainland Britain’s most southerly point. The Lizard Peninsula is inundated with flora, fauna and geology. Incredibly, over half of all the UK’s species of plants can be found here including over fifty rare and special species. You will probably spot seals and may be lucky enough to see dolphins or basking sharks.

The rocks and minerals here are also spectacular and send geologists wild — part of the reason is that this is a crunch-point for plate tectonics! The ocean floor and continental land-mass were mashed together here in the Devonian era, between 358 and 419 million years ago — Coverack is one of the only places on Earth where this can be seen.

Forever Cornwall Coverack Harbour Low Res

Watersports and hidden wrecks

Whilst this stretch of coast used to be notorious for shipwrecks and smuggling, we think you’ll be in safe hands venturing onto the water today… The Coverack Windsurfing Centre offers stand-up-paddleboarding, kayaking and fishing trips, as well as RYA Windsurf tuition. The sandy bay provides protection from prevailing South Westerly winds, creating a perfect beginner’s area close to the shore until you build your confidence and head further out. Whether you’re doing a five-day course or one morning on the water, you’ll be sure to enjoy the scenery.

After your time spent afloat, why not indulge in some good hearty pub food at The Paris Hotel? The pub takes its name from the American liner which hit the rocks off Lowland Point on Whit Monday, 1899. Sit a while and imagine the stories of the sailors who’ve passed through these rooms…

Beaches
Kynance Cove The Helford Cornwall

Kynance Cove

Kynance Cove is one of Cornwall’s most dramatic beaches. A bit of a walk from the car park, visitors are rewarded with turquoise seas, huge rock stacks and hidden corners of sandy beach (when the tide’s out!) where you feel as though you’re the only ones there. In the winter, grab a hot chocolate from the cafe above and watch the waves roll into this dramatic cove. Dogs are welcome between October and Easter Sunday.

Poldhu Cove, Cornwall

Poldhu

Poldhu is a sheltered cove with parking, a cafe and a surf school – and blissful golden sands. With seasonal lifeguards, it’s a great place to try out watersports, go for a paddle or, when the tide’s out, head to the rockpools for some exploring. Dogs are welcome between October and Easter Sunday.

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Kennack Sands

Kennack Sands is a large beach with great amenities. Perfect for families, there’s good lifeguard cover and plenty of space for kids to run. It is actually comprised of two beaches – the one furthest from the car park is a nature reserve and often goes undiscovered by visitors, as it’s hidden behind the hill that separates the two. Well worth a visit (there’s great shore fishing too!). Dogs are welcome between October and Easter Sunday.

Things to do
Forever Cornwall Mullion Kayaking

Take to the water…

Because Coverack is relatively sheltered and has direct access to miles of dramatic and unspoilt coastline, it’s a popular spot for water-sports including diving and windsurfing. From early summer to autumn you can hire kayaks and stand up paddleboards, and you can get RYA approved windsurfing tuition.

Tall Ship Cadgwith

Cadgwith

Make the short trip down the coastal fishing village of Cadgwith one Friday, and experience the atmosphere of the Cadgwith Cove Singers. The sea shanties are brilliant, the beer is delicious and it’s a quintessentially Cornish way to spend a Friday evening.

Seal Sanctuary, Gweek

The Seal Sanctuary

The Seal Sanctuary is an excellent day out for families, friends or couples come rain or shine. It’s home to otters, sea lions, penguins and of course, seals, and is dedicated to educating people on the struggles of marine life and why conservation for these seemingly abundant animals is so necessary. Visit the penguins at feeding time, become a keeper for a day and see seals on their way to recovery at the Seal Hospital.

Food & Drink
Lifboat House Their Pic

The Lifeboat House

Prominently protruding out from Coverack is The Lifeboat House. In 1980 the building was given a new lease of life and converted into a bar, restaurant and chippy. Offering freshly landed fish, local ingredients and one of the best views in the village, this is must when visiting this beautiful corner of the planet. The Lifeboat House has also won several awards, including the Times naming it the “top fish and chip shop in Britain” – now that’s prestigious!

The Paris Hotel Their Pic

The Paris Hotel

If you’re looking for a scenic place to have a pint, then look no further than the Paris Hotel. The pub is named after an American steamer, the SS Paris, which was wrecked on the treacherous coast near Coverack in 1899. Located in the village, the building boasts ocean views with all the cosy character you expect from a Cornish pub. It serves a range of wines, spirits and local ales, and fresh seafood from the aptly-named Oceanview Restaurant.

The pub is dog-friendly too! Dogs aren’t allowed in the restaurant, but you’re more than welcome to eat in the pub if you want to bring along the pooch.

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The Cadgwith Cove Inn

The Cadgwith Cove Inn is nestled in the picturesque fishing village of the same name. It is clear the pub is the centre of life in the village, which is still a thriving community centred around fishing. It is right on the South West Coast Path, so it offers a well-deserved stop for walkers looking for local beer and seafood next to a roaring fire.

Don’t miss the sea shanties from the local group every Friday. The pub tends to get busy when they sing, so be sure to arrive early to find a spot and get a pint in.

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